The Hope Diamond

The Hope Diamond

The mystical blue diamond has been making media waves across the world, and for good reason. These fascinating stones are often prized for their great rareness, in addition to their stunning appearance, remarkable quality and propensity for being sold in auctions for record-breaking millions of dollars.

But there’s more than meets the eye when it comes to blue diamonds. Here are some things you probably didn’t know about them:

THE BLUE HUE INDICATES AN IMPURITY
Diamonds exhibit color thanks to the presence of an impurity. According to "The Fancy Color Diamond Book", boron particles, which are trapped within the crystal lattice as the diamond begins to form, absorbs yellow light which in turn produces a diamond’s blue hue.
The Most Expensive One Sold for $57.5 Million
The 14.62 carat "Oppenheimer Blue", named after its previous owner, recently smashed auction records with an astounding $57.5 million bid by an undisclosed private buyer.

THERE’S ONLY ONE RARER THAN THE BLUE DIAMOND
As you would have already guessed by now, blue diamonds are pretty extraordinary. One of the reasons for their famous mystical quality comes from the fact that blue diamonds, apart from the more mysterious red diamond (with only 100 recorded discoveries), are the rarest diamond in the world.

THEY’RE MOSTLY FOUND IN THE CULLINAN MINE
While blue diamonds are not an exclusive discovery at the Cullinan Mine of South Africa, it’s arguable the primary producer of these gorgeous stones. Among the mine’s more interesting recent discoveries reportedly include a 122.52 stone and the 12 carat Blue Moon.

THE DARK SIDE OF THE BLUE DIAMOND
One of the most famous blue diamonds in the world is reportedly cursed. The Hope Diamond’s history dates back to at least four centuries, and is often said to have claimed the lives of its famous owners including King Louis XIV, Jean Baptiste-Tavernier and Marie Antoinette. A New York Times article from 1911 listed a few of the coincidentally tragic deaths of those who have owned the Hope Diamond, including suicides, murders and unfortunate ends. No one knows whether the deaths are just mere coincidences, but one thing’s for sure – the Hope Diamond has been displayed at Washington’s National Museum of Natural History since 1958.

Source: Luxury-Insider.com     Photo: Wikipedia.com  

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