KELLY LE BROCK

Exclusive Interview

Photo by ManfredBaumann.com

Photo by ManfredBaumann.com

EAT LOVE SAVOR Magazine’s Founder, Editor in Chief and Publisher Angela Tunner spoke with Ms. Le Brock in this exclusive interview. During their in depth conversation, Ms. Le Brock a charming, well spoken woman, opened up sharing her stories about her life after the limelight, discussing her view points and philosophies, her vision and perspectives on luxury, allowing us to go deeper into her mind; beyond the superficiality and into what drives her and the essence of what makes Kelly who she is.

There is much more than meets the eye to actress, food enthusiast, farmer and philanthropist Kelly Le Brock.

The woman behind the beautiful face, movie roles and headlines, is an intelligent, soulful, articulate, insightful and passionate woman who embraces simplified luxurious living and clean healthy food who farms much of it herself.  Beyond her sophistication, world travels, and a life lived in opulence lies a desire for simpler living. She has a great love of good food, stresses the importance of reconnecting with nature and embracing an approach to living going back to basics blended with luxurious style and flourish. She has been happily tucked away for many years on her vast ranch in California far away from the spotlight. So what has she been doing since leaving her public life behind? What lies beyond those piercing eyes and beautiful smile? What we discovered was an enchanting woman of great depth, wisdom and vast inner beauty.

Who is Kelly Le Brock? The American actress and model debuted in the movie “The Woman in Red” co-starring comic actor Gene Wilder, also starred in the films Weird Science, directed by John Hughes, and Hard to Kill, with Steven Seagal. She was born in New York City, was brought up in London, United Kingdom, the daughter of a French-Canadian father who owned a quicksilver mine and opened The General Thurber Inn, a three-star Michelin restaurant in Rouses Point, New York. Ms. Le Brock’s Irish mother was a former model, and owner of a London based fine antique stores. Le Brock spent her early days in Buckinghamshire, England and Lewes, Sussex. She made a move at the age of 16 back to New York and began her career in modelling. Her appearance in a Pantene shampoo commercial brought her notoriety for the pop-culture catchphrase “Don’t hate me because I’m beautiful” and went on to appear in movies. Having stepped away from the limelight some time ago, Le Brock has appeared in several movies and on TV since 2000.

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW


After your time spent living in the limelight, you retreated into nature. What have been some of the notable shifts that happened to you to heal and realign your purpose and perception of your place in the world?

What happens with no electricity and no TV is magic. What happens when you step out of Hollywood to hilly woods with bear and mountain lions and rattlesnake knocking at your door.  Well it sort of wakes you up to the reality that we are not superior or stronger or smarter than these God given creatures. Being with babbling creeks and clear blue skies calms the horrendous panic attacks I have. Being in the limelight for me created confusion and stress.  Being looked at and feasted upon by the hungry eyes of greedy men and the claws of women is not where I feel good or safe. I always felt alone in a crowd but in nature I feel full of heart and joy, even though I am the only one standing.  I would have to say that the most notable shift has been the confidence that the open space I live in has given me. People say aren’t you afraid of being out in the wilds by yourself? Aren’t you afraid of being attacked by a lion or a bear?  I tell them you wouldn’t walk across a busy road without looking; it’s the same for the wilds. Pay attention, look, listen and learn; when there is silence its easier to hear the noise.  The sounds of modern society grinds on my very sensitive and lightly tuned psyche so I think I will stay home for awhile longer and move about the cities, with the country always in my heart.

Your family was in the arts and antiques business in London, how did this influence your life?

Yes I definitely grew up in opulence, steeped richly in historical homes and the finest antiques. I loved pretending and working at the desk, answering the phone in my parents art gallery and seeing the history in the hands that had done these paintings many, many centuries ago. I loved to fantasize that I was in their time and story. I have a bench from the 15th century, English or Scottish, and as I sit in it sometimes, I try to hear the ghosts or feel the times in its harsh, but slender hold. I now as my family have passed on, inherited all of my mothers prized possessions, although, I think she would have loved to take them with her as she often said. I love having them and really don’t need any more. I tend to keep the keepsakes of my worlds travels to hearts, rocks, shells and simple things that can go back to the earth.

Photo by ManfredBaumann.com

Photo by ManfredBaumann.com

From all of your global travels, what are some of your favorite global spots to visit for inspiration?

I really love Maui and Hawaii, the history of Europe, Spain, France, and England. But quite frankly, the American countryside and wilderness is some of the most spectacular landscape I’ve ever seen. My wilderness, my backyard, is as wild as Africa, maybe more so. No one is feeding the loins in the majestic mountains I live in. Nature is inspiration and we can find that in all sorts of parts of the world.

What a good mind finds in any circumstances can make anything seem luxurious.

What is a typical day like for you on your property and with your various projects and activities?

It can be chasing wayward goats out of my vegetable garden buck-naked at 6am or having to chase a bull out of the wrong field with a broom. There is really no real typical day other than milking (yes I do), feeding, and cleaning. There is much checking that goes on with a big place: check waters, clean and available, that feed is fresh and without mold.  I could be fixing fences or painting or gardening. Riding seems to have been stolen slightly by the emails and new social media, but I love to go out for hours, checking on livestock or deer. Making sure my perimeter fence will hold my livestock and not mix with neighboring charges, so really nothing is ever a typical day. And as I wake in the morning and view my emails, sometimes I’m invited to far away countries to dine for dinner with complete strangers. So from the wilderness of my ranch to the cities of our world, I love the contrast.

What activities do you enjoy for relaxation and leisure?

Well I’m going to keep it PG, but I love: cooking, writing, riding, sleeping, being with those I love at a meal of sumptuous sups full of conversation and joy or hanging in a hammock on a deserted island with clear turquoise green waving its luscious white caps gently. Funnily enough, even though I haven’t had television for 21 something years, I do love to hold that TV clicker or watch a great movie. Although I guess TV isn’t really an activity. I love hiking and swimming as well but mostly just trying to find the relaxation and leisure in any part of any kind of day.

What is your guilty pleasure?

Why should there be guilt in pleasure, in passion? I tried to stop that years ago. Life’s moments pass so fast; and when you die it wouldn’t have mattered if you’d had that cake or that chocolate. For me, I’m a fool for truffles and caviar, to the point of actually growling at an unsuspecting waiter who was trying to take my plate that still had a few specks left of the black or white divine root. Caviar, caviar, caviar, there must be something special in it that makes it so appreciated by every cell in my body to my very core. And of course there is chocolate. As a kid, sweets were my life. Sleeping away at school in a boarding house, I would breed hamsters in the bathrooms to sell to local pet shops for money so I could have my Tuck.

What is your definition of luxury?

To be well fed rested warm when it’s cold and cool when it’s hot. Ok private planes, but a great luxury is to be able to sit for a long time and be able to chat for long hours after dinner. A definite luxury in today’s world is to be able to pay ones bills. I have since thrown out all of the obvious luxuries, to settle for a more humble and real idea of what our true luxuries really are. And these I believe are becoming simple things like the ability to pay your bills or be healthy.

We believe that luxury is a state of mind and a lifestyle choice, taking form in many manners…How have you crafted your ideal luxury lifestyle?

To not have to get up in the morning early, to relish the moment upon rising that you could if you chose to just go back to sleep-I have worked so hard since 16, getting up at 4am and sometimes finishing at 1am.  Luxury is indeed a state of mind; luxury could be a large machete to cook your meat on because your lead horse has run off with all of your cooking implements so you have to improvise.  Hot water coming from a stream into a tub is better than any expensive luxury spa to me.  Seeing the stars gleam and sparkle in such a glorious way that not many can experience due to light pollution.  I do believe there is also luxury in more luxury as well!  I guess perception all has to do with just that; what a good mind finds in any circumstances can make anything seem luxurious.

Where does your passion for food stem from?

I would have to say that it comes from my father, who every night and morning would put on a splendid dinner and morning spread.  Even though we had lost many of the monetary things, nothing kept us from sitting down to a home cooked meal. As a child, I had many dislikes, but my father always challenged me to try different food, textures and types so I would have a more open palate to take into adulthood.  In Europe we with friends and family sit for hours of the day with fat stomachs, warm conversation and much laughter.  As a famous model and then movie person people have and continue to go out of their way to impress and show off their abilities to make something everyone has had but they make better.  I just love and lap up the sheer joy and contentment that people have when they are serving people food.  It Is a universal language without a single spoken word.

Photo by ManfredBaumann.com

Photo by ManfredBaumann.com

What are some of the favorite meals simple through gourmet, and where are the most notable places you have dined over the years that have left an impression?

Pasta, pasta, pasta, one particular salad and just making up things from scratch from what’s left. I love to make a leg of lamb with roast potatoes; I always put a lot of heart in my food. I am certainly not classically trained, I stumble and fall and test in a variety of ways. I was in the kitchen, with a two or three star Michelin chef Marco Pierre White, who was amazing but I learned only how to burn myself as I was doing a reality show who beat up the poor celebs; Hells Kitchen. I knew it would be a disastrous affair as far as the producers making it as miserable as possible. But I fantasized about being a chef in a Michelin star resultant like my parents had in upstate New York; The General Thurber a two star restaurant. I still own the wine list which is absolutely priceless. I make simple, basic soaked and sprouted beans and rice’s and believe in raw dairy and ONLY raw dairy as well as fermented foods. Now I tend to eat cleaner and boy is it tasty! One of my favorite chefs, Michelle Gerard, cooked for me in the South of France where I was doing a 20 page spread for Vogue. The tastes and talents of this man were amazing. He made the most beautiful burger out of beets with other delights which I still remember to day. Tasted like the finest burger that I have ever had, but did not contain a single morsel of meat.

I want my legacy to be to try and make peoples plights less painful and our fellow humans have a lot more laughter.

What has your experience in farming and owning sprawling land taught you about food?

That going to the supermarket is a lazy-man’s way… that if you are really farming, its bloody hard work, that hands and hair and nails and clothing all go to hell; and I love it. If you can’t catch it, grow it, feed it what you want it to eat and kill it, then you should stick to veggies or don’t eat it. It has definitely given a soul to my experience, to my experience with food to grow and tend the vegetables, to milk the goat, and to make cheeses and yogurts like people have done for thousands of years is very important to me. It seems so strange that we have grown so far away from our lands and most people are comfortable eating other peoples kill.

What do you wish more people knew about the value of reconnecting with nature?

Without nature, we die. Our society is trying to saran wrap meats and label vegetables, that look like they haven’t even been in soil.  Soil is the cloth that weaves us all; nature keeps us sane and connected to our own animal instincts and behaviors. This fast paced, microwave, radiation, computerized world messes with our own electrical currency.  I need nature so I can decompress and shake off all the negative impact that this world we live in throws at us.  When we disconnect from the greatness in our mountains, rivers and wildlife, we die a sort of death (or we disconnect from ourselves). This for me is death.

Tell us about your philanthropic work and special ties to food banks?

I used to do charity work but have since stopped not knowing where the monies are really going and after discovering some questionable administrative activities in a charity I once aided, so I decided to make my cause be something I have more control over, hence my participation with foodtweeks founded by Jay Walker. How fantastic is it that everyone who downloads foodtweeks wins and helps hungry and starving people; men, women and children going hungry in this country is deplorable.

What do you see as your legacy?

No doubt about it, my children. My effect on getting the medical treatment to people that wouldn’t harm more or even cost them their life and I am now trying to help feed the hungry in this rich and wasteful country. The definition of legacy is (law): a gift of personal property by will. Are children personal property of sorts-I certainly see who they are as a sort of legacy. That I may have brought a good type of being into this planet that will contribute and show love for our fellow souls and earth.  What do I want to know for?  I think for in spite of the brutalities I have suffered instead of being bitter, hateful and resentful I am trying to do better for those that have been in my position. We must somehow be able to forgive, however, never have to forget. I think that my films (the good ones) and modeling days are a sort of portfolio and legacy to my youth, now I want my legacy to be to try and make peoples plights less painful and our fellow humans have a lot more laughter.

Source: eatlovesavor.com     Photos: ManfredBaumann.com

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